Organize Motivation and Discipline

Use discipline dice – list consequences 1-6.

When kids are out of line, they role the dice and take the consequence.

Wheel of consequences – same idea. Works great if kids help determine consequences.

Use job charts, reading charts, potty charts, calendars, stickers to motivate. Remove yourself from the

situation. They always think it’s a great idea until they find out it’s your idea.

Threat: “I’m counting to three – you’d better be brushing your teeth or else….” Bribe: “If you brush your teeth

now, I’ll read you a story when you’re done.” Trick: “What do your cards say to do next?” Trick: “Can you brush

your teeth before I count to…?”


Organize Kid’s Stuff

Use see-through bins for toys – with lids kids can remove unassisted.

Organize toy containers with pictures so even young children can put away their own toys.

Use color-coded hanging folders in your file system for school papers your kids want to keep.

Hang color-coded bins in the kitchen for papers you need to review for school.

Photograph kid’s 3-D creations, save the picture instead of the creation. Create a special photo album for

those projects.

If you have a particularly artistic child give them a defined space for their projects and then help them keep

their collection to a manageable size.

Use a basket for library books. Keep it in a main room of the house. Make it functional. It goes with you to and

from the library.

Kids should have a place for their stuff in every room. Make sure they know where it is and they maintain it.

Keep kitchen kid-stuff low so they can access it. Put dishes and silverware low so they can set the table. Keep

some art supplies or puzzles low – perfect for when you are making dinner and they want to be with you.


Organize Kid’s Rooms

Involve your children in organizing. If they are not on board, your system is not going to work.

Establish traditional de-junking with them. One family has their children set out presents every Christmas Eve

that they want Santa to take to another family.

Color-code the laundry containers in each room so your children can sort their own laundry. When it’s time to

do laundry, you’ll simply need to gather the jeans from the blue container.

Keep children’s dressers in laundry room – establish the laundry room is the place where they should always

dress and undress. You’ll be amazed at how clean their rooms will stay.

When your child can negotiate hangers, insert a tension rod in the closet. Adjust the height as she grows.

If you have a bed-wetter, get two water-proof fitted sheets and two regular sheets. Make the bed with one

water-proof then one regular, then another water-proof and the other regular. That way, when they have an

accident at night, all you have to do is remove the first layer and they can go right back to sleep!

Remove closet doors and make the closet an extension of your child’s room. You can replace the doors with

curtains to add fun and decoration.


Organize Kid’s Time

SIMPLIFY!

Stick with the same routines for morning and bed time.

Clean out a dresser drawer and call it the “night before drawer.” Put everything in the drawer she’ll need when

she wakes up.

Have child draw a self-portrait of his face on a paper-plate and then place the plate in the middle of the floor

and have your child lay-out all his clothes for the next day on his “mini-me.”

Calendar square size should correspond with family size. Color-code activities by person on calendar.

Use media money to set limits on TV and computer time.


Organize other Stuff ‘n Things

Remember: People are more important than things.

Color-code every family member. Use colors on calendars, color-dot their socks and underwear, use colors for

sheets, towels, toothbrushes, and kitchen cups or anything they tend to fight over or get mixed up.

Laminate and use kid’s art for bookmarks or placemats.

If you must pick up an item that doesn’t belong to you, don’t make the mistake of carefully putting it away;

place it where it can’t be found. Charge a ransom (money or extra job) to have the item returned. Beats

nagging.